Expecting mothers should go for pregnancy-friendly exercises and should get comfortable maternity gear for working out, says an expert.

Yuvraj Randhawa, gym trainer and owner of Health Plus gym (H+), gives an insight on smart ways to exercise safely during pregnancy:

Don’t lie on your back
Avoid exercises that require you to lie flat on your back, especially crunches after the first trimester. Lying on your back for an extended period could make you feel dizzy as this can decrease blood flow to you and to your baby.

Get maternity gear
Comfort and flexibility are must during workouts but the baby bump needs to be accommodated throughout your pregnancy. Look for workout wear that is specifically sized to your body, shoe and measurements. There should be nothing too constrictive, nor anything too loose. Make sure you don’t get too warm, as over-heating can pose a threat to the baby.

Go for pregnancy friendly exercises
Walking briskly, swimming regularly and parental yoga are all very healthy and easy on baby. Remember that your joints become loose and your centre of gravity shifts with pregnancy, so you cannot just scale down your usual routine. Seek out a moderate programme that keeps you strong and fit in a relaxed and safe manner.

Get more rest than usual
Most expectant mothers need more sitting, napping and relaxing, but if you have got a healthy fitness routine going, you need even more time to recoup. Don’t ever keep yourself in overdrive, no matter how much you have got going on or how great your love of working out may be. Keeping yourself fit during this time is a very healthy decision, but it also must be a wise one; listen to your body.

Be prepared to modify your routine
You may not be able to keep up that 10km run when you’re pregnant, which is totally fine. Hormonal changes during pregnancy make you more flexible and your growing belly can throw off your centre of balance, making your standby workouts more difficult. You may need to cut your workouts a bit short (take a 20 minute walk instead) or decrease your speed or resistance.

Source: IANS

In a significant progress towards the development of a vaccine against HIV, scientists have developed a new approach to help the immune system actively fight the virus in the body. For the first time, researchers showed that a combined approach – using a common cold virus to introduce a vaccine into the body, as well as an injection of a DNA-based vaccine – may help protect against HIV in the gut and bodily cavities.

“With sexual activity being one of the primary methods of HIV transmission, it is necessary to try to protect those parts of the body that are most likely to encounter the virus first,” said Branka Grubor-Bauk, from the University of Adelaide in Australia.

“A possible reason why previous HIV vaccine trials have not been successful is because of this lack of a frontline protection,” Grubor-Bauk said.

The laboratory studies, conducted so far in mice represent an important step forward in attempts to introduce a first line of defence against HIV at the site of infection.

“In mice, we delivered a rhinovirus (or common cold virus) inside the nose, and this virus had been altered to include HIV proteins,” Grubor-Bauk said.

“At the same time, the mice also received an injection into the skin containing a DNA-based vaccine. This approach resulted in very specific responses in the immune system,” she said.

“This vaccine approach encompasses two different arms of the immune system: white blood cells that attack the HIV virus, and specific antibodies that recognise and shut down HIV-positive cells,” she added.

“There is an element of HIV known as Tat that helps the virus to replicate quite rapidly,” said Eric Gowans, professor at University of Adelaide. The antibodies inhibit the Tat effect, preventing HIV from replicating itself, Gowans added. “Overall, we found that infection was considerably reduced in the mice we studied,” he said.

The study appears in the journal Scientific Reports.

Source: PTI

It is well known that smoking is injurious to health and causes lung cancer, but a recent study has found that smoking is fatal for diabetic patients. A study, presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) suggested that heavy smokers with diabetes are at increased risk of death. Diabetes is a chronic illness in which there are high levels of glucose in the blood. One in four people with diabetes doesn’t know he or she has it. Having diabetes can also put people at risk for numerous other health complications.

To determine the extent to which diabetes is associated with deaths from lung cancer, other cancers, and other causes among heavy smokers, researchers examined the risk for all-cause mortality among people with and without diabetes within the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), a massive, multicenter trial that compared low-dose helical CT with chest X-ray for early detection of lung cancer in current and former heavy smokers.

“In our study, we found a statistically significant link between diabetes and all-cause deaths, non-lung cancer deaths and lung cancer deaths in women,” said Kavita Garg, M.D., professor of radiology from the University of Colorado – Denver.

For the study, Dr. Garg and colleagues looked at data from 53,454 participants in the NLST and identified 5,174 participants who reported having diabetes at screening.

They conducted an analysis of the relative risk for overall mortality, lung cancer mortality, and non-lung cancer mortality associated with diabetes, adjusting for age, gender, body mass index (BMI), and pack-years of smoking. Over the course of the study, there were 3,936 total deaths, including 1,021 from lung cancer and 826 from cancers not of the lung.

Participants with diabetes tended to be older, reported more pack-years of smoking, and had a higher BMI than those without diabetes. There were 650 deaths (12.6 percent of patients) among participants with diabetes and 3,286 deaths (6.8 percent of patients) among participants without diabetes.

“We found that diabetes doubles the risk for all-cause mortality and non-lung cancer mortality among heavy smokers,” Dr. Garg said. “We also found that women with diabetes have an increased risk of lung-cancer mortality, but did not find the same effect in men.”

The researchers continue to analyze data in an effort to better understand the underlying cause. In the meantime, Dr. Garg emphasizes the importance of taking control of diabetes and undergoing lung cancer screening if you’re a smoker.

“Patients have to take care of their diabetes to maximize the benefit of CT screening for lung cancer,” she said. “It truly makes a magnitude of difference in mortality risk.”

Source:ANI

Love to eat hard cheese, whole milk, butter, beef, and chocolate? Beware, as a new study suggests that regular consumption of such major saturated fatty acids can increase the risk of coronary heart disease. These should be replaced with unsaturated fats, whole grain carbohydrates or plant proteins, as part of an effective preventive approach, the study suggested.

The findings showed that replacing 1 per cent of the daily energy intake from the combined group of these major saturated fatty acids with equivalent energy from polyunsaturated fats, monounsaturated fats, whole grain carbohydrates, or plant proteins, was estimated to reduce coronary heart disease risk by 6-8 per cent.

“Dietary recommendations should remain on replacing total saturated fat with unsaturated fats or whole grain carbohydrate, as an effective approach towards preventing coronary heart disease,” said Geng Zong, doctoral student at Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health. For the study, the team analysed data from two large US longitudinal cohort studies that involved 73,147 women between 1984-2012, and 42,635 men between 1986-2010.

The results revealed that the most commonly consumed major saturated fatty acids were lauric acid, myristic acid, palmitic acid and stearic acid, and accounted for around 9-10 per cent of total energy in the participants. Each of these saturated fatty acids was associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease.

In addition, the researchers estimated the reduction in risk that would be associated with replacement of saturated fatty acids with more healthy nutrients.

For each 1 per cent energy substitution, these risk reductions were 23 cases per 100,000 person years for polyunsaturated fat, 15 cases per 100,000 person years for monounsaturated fat, 18 cases per 100,000 person years for whole grain carbohydrates, and 20 cases per 100,000 person years for plant proteins, the researchers stated in the study published in the journal The BMJ.

Source: IANS

With the winter season approaching, we need to take extra care of our lips. Drinking a good amount of water, shuffling your professional lip balm with remedies like butter or ghee, and keeping your tongue in check are critical elements of lip care, says as expert.

Abhishek Raj, facial aesthetic expert, has rolled out a few tips to battle the problems:

Drink water: You know that your skin needs hydration and that happens best with the intake of enough water. The same goes for lips. Though people drink enough water in summers, this intake decreases in winters because we do not sweat in the cold season and feel thirsty. Drinking ample amount of water is necessary to replenish the lost moisture from the skin and the lips.

Hold your tongue: Most of us have a habit of licking our lips now and then with our tongue. This tendency increases whenever the lips feel dry and stretched. You need moisture to keep them soft and hydrated and saliva comes handy for this. But, this proves counter-productive and dries away the lips more.

Avoid vitamin B deficiency: Insufficient consumption of vitamin B not only affects your digestive system’s functioning but it also affects the health of the lips. The lips and the corners of the mouth get cracked and deficiency of vitamin B can also cause ulcers in the mouth. Ensure enough intake of vitamin B to keep lips healthy during winters.

Lip augmentation or hydration procedure: For people who have thin lips and desire a pronounced appearance, dermal fillers like Juvederm are very effective. When administered into the lips, the hyaluronic acid based fillers give volume to the lips, and give them more definition. The hydrophilic gel also promotes water retention and provides hydration to dry and chapped lips. The effect lasts up to six to nine months.

Avoid smoking: If its health implications are not enough of a reason for you to quit, give it up for your lips. It causes the lips to become dry and dark. Chain smokers and chain coffee drinkers usually tend to have dark lips. If not for general health reasons, cut down your dependence on caffeine and smoking for improving lip appearance.

Scrub: To keep the lips fresh and healthy, it can help to use a scrub on them occasionally. This will clear away the dead cells and make the lips more receptive to moisturising agents. You can use a mixture of sugar powder and olive oil or honey to gently scrub away dead cells.

Source: IANS

Its no surprise that as the temperature takes a dive during winter, our skin problems soar. So, it is time to show your skin some extra love after all the festivities and harsh weather, says an expert. Disha Meher, National Expert – Skin and Nails, Lakmé Salon, lists an easy and simple cheat sheet that will put an end to all your winter agonies.

Dehydration: If your skin looks patchy and fine lines have started appearing, it is definitely dehydrated and dry. The moisture level of your skin is decreasing because of reduced sebum. Opt for a white tea skin treatment as it has antioxidant properties that nourish your skin and restore its vital moisture content.

Sensitivity: Redness and inflammation are usually of sensitivity that occur due to changes in the weather conditions. Choose your products very carefully and moisturise you skin regularly to combat sensitivity. You can also try a soothing facial, like Lakmé Salon’s Sensi-calm facial, that will restore your skin’s pH levels.

Lifeless and sallow skin: Your skin might lose its lustre and look lifeless. The skin’s acid mantle is affected and hence the skin’s moisture and oil balance is disturbed. Massage your skin with a nourishing oil like Argan oil before sleeping. It will maintain the necessary levels of collagen in your skin.

Cracked feet: A common problem faced during winter is cracked feet. These superficial or deep fissures on the heels make your feet very rough. It is vital to avoid remaining bare foot and to moisturise your feet regularly. During winter, apply a thick moisturiser or a special cracked feet cream and wear socks while sleeping.

Source: IANS

Samosas, bread pakoras, patties, burgers, chowmein and other oil-laden artery-clogging food in cafeterias and vending machines stocked with calorie dense beverages such as colas or the sugary tea and coffee. This is pretty much the standard array of food in workplaces, churned out by food contractors with questionable hygiene standards.

There is little attention paid to food in offices both by the employer and employees. Too often, the workplace meal programs are an afterthought, characterised by high calorie, high fat, high sugar and high salt food, leaving employees with no healthy options. Many employers believe adults are responsible for their own health, while workers also feel the pressure to skip lunch, the so called desktop dining or SAD (stuck at desk) café phenomenon. A missed or incomplete lunch, however, lowers productivity, increases stress and leads to unhealthy afternoon snacking.

The truth is that neglecting workplace eating choices are virtually a recipe for disaster. Numerous studies indicate that food at work can impact not only employee health but have far reaching impact on the company’s health.Obese workers are twice as likely to miss work.

It seems that the workplace, instead of facilitating or even accommodating healthy food choices, has become a hindrance to good health. It is ironical as the quality of what we eat and drink at work directly impacts the quality of work and our productivity. Snacking on sugary food and drinks, which the body digests quickly, cause a short surge in energy but ultimately leave the body more fatigued.

The connection between nutrition, fatigue and drowsiness is well known. Fatigue or lack of energy, is often due to overwork or nutritional deficiency, most commonly that of iron but also of B vitamins. Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional disorder in the world (about 80 per cent of the world’s population may have some level of iron deficiency). It not only reduces work capacity but can become a serious block to economic development. Besides sluggishness, it results in low immunity, low endurance and a decrease in work productivity for mental and physical tasks, which can drop to as much as 30 per cent.


Written by Ishi Khosla | Published:November 19, 2016 12:16 am
office food, office food nutrition, workplace food, workplace food regulations, health tips, lifestyle news Major industrial accidents, including the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster, have been partly attributed to errors made by fatigued night-shift workers.

Samosas, bread pakoras, patties, burgers, chowmein and other oil-laden artery-clogging food in cafeterias and vending machines stocked with calorie dense beverages such as colas or the sugary tea and coffee. This is pretty much the standard array of food in workplaces, churned out by food contractors with questionable hygiene standards.

There is little attention paid to food in offices both by the employer and employees. Too often, the workplace meal programs are an afterthought, characterised by high calorie, high fat, high sugar and high salt food, leaving employees with no healthy options. Many employers believe adults are responsible for their own health, while workers also feel the pressure to skip lunch, the so called desktop dining or SAD (stuck at desk) café phenomenon. A missed or incomplete lunch, however, lowers productivity, increases stress and leads to unhealthy afternoon snacking.

The truth is that neglecting workplace eating choices are virtually a recipe for disaster. Numerous studies indicate that food at work can impact not only employee health but have far reaching impact on the company’s health.Obese workers are twice as likely to miss work.

It seems that the workplace, instead of facilitating or even accommodating healthy food choices, has become a hindrance to good health. It is ironical as the quality of what we eat and drink at work directly impacts the quality of work and our productivity. Snacking on sugary food and drinks, which the body digests quickly, cause a short surge in energy but ultimately leave the body more fatigued.

The connection between nutrition, fatigue and drowsiness is well known. Fatigue or lack of energy, is often due to overwork or nutritional deficiency, most commonly that of iron but also of B vitamins. Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional disorder in the world (about 80 per cent of the world’s population may have some level of iron deficiency). It not only reduces work capacity but can become a serious block to economic development. Besides sluggishness, it results in low immunity, low endurance and a decrease in work productivity for mental and physical tasks, which can drop to as much as 30 per cent.

We become sleepy after a big meal while smaller mid-day meals keep us alert and awake. Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar, can result both as a result of a large meal or if one skips a meal. It can shorten attention span and slow the speed at which individuals process information. Major industrial accidents, including the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster, have been partly attributed to errors made by fatigued night-shift workers.

In China and India, lost productivity due to diet related diseases amounted to 0.5 per cent and 0.7 per cent of GDP in 2001. In developing countries, governments are often burdened by the treatment of malnutrition, infectious diseases and parasitic infestations. The double burden appears to be more challenging in these countries as heart disease, diabetes and other such diseases are increasing in the younger age groups. Populations are exposed to new food and lifestyles and what happened in the West over 200 years is occurring in just over two decades here.

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and obesity have assumed epidemic proportions in developing countries. Consumption of high fat, dangerous fat like trans fats, high sugar coupled with decreased physical activity, poor exercise habits and passive entertainment have a direct impact on development of these conditions.

Considering that employees spend the better part of their waking hours at work, the workplace represents a logical place to ensure proper nutrition through healthy meal provision. It is also an ideal setting to educate employees on proper nutrition and hygiene, the effect percolating to families and entire population at little cost. The solutions and intervention also boost employee morale, reduce the number of accidents and sick days, save on long term health care costs, promote the employer’s image and increase national GDP. Clearly, a healthy organisation is a wealthy organisation.

WHO has noted that adequate nourishment could raise national productivity by 20 per cent. Nobody says that the workplace alone is enough to make a change; rather it is the most essential and the best place to make a start. From multinationals to small scale enterprises, everyone can benefit from improved attention to food at work. Changes whether through improved cafeterias or mess halls, or introduction of healthy meal options, provision of safe and hygienic food and drinking water are well within the reach of any business, even the smallest ones.

Good nutrition is good business!

Source: Indian Express

By:  Ishi Khosla

As deteriorating air quality can lead to increase in asthma cases, health experts have suggested salt room therapy as highly beneficial in the treatment of the respiratory illness.

According to them, salt room therapy has been tested in various parts of the world. It is completely natural and can provide symptomatic relief to patients suffering from respiratory problems.

“Dangerously high level of pollution has taken a toll on the respiratory health of the people. Not just older people and children, but youths and apparently healthy people are also falling prey to rising pollution. Treatment like Salt Room Therapy — which is a natural form of treatment — can provide symptomatic relief to the patients,” said Animesh Ray, Consultant Pulmonologist at Fortis, Vasant Kunj.

Explaining the therapy, Ray said that patients are asked to relax in a room with walls thickly lined with salt. Light air is continuously blown into the room, helping the minute salt particles mix in the air which is breathed by the patient.

According to doctors, the salt particles after reaching the nose and the respiratory tract remove all debris and bacteria. They also help in the abatement of bronchial inflammation and strengthening of the immune system that decreases allergic reaction to pollen.

Varsa, another city based respiratory expert, said the basic science behind the salt therapy is it normalizes the passage of air through the bronchial tubes — leading to widening of the airway passages and restoring the normal transport of mucus and unclogging blockages in the bronchi — thereby helping control asthmatic attacks.

Anju Chandra, founder of Salt Room Therapy, agreed and said, “Salt room therapy is a drug-free treatment for asthma, chronic bronchitis, sinusitis, allergic and skin ailments. I am hopeful that this initiative will not just help people with respiratory and skin conditions, but will offer them an effective drug free treatment option to fight the rising pollution all around us.”

Source: IANS

Do you want your children to eat more healthy food and less fast food? Researchers have recommended placing healthy food more visibly, attractively and conveniently so that your child can eat and stay healthy.

Strongly preferred foods — like fries at fast food restaurants or red meat at buffets — are so standard that it can be difficult to get people — especially children — to opt for healthier options, even if the healthy option is the default.

The findings indicated that more children choose French fries over apples when apples were presented as the default option. “We guessed that children would opt out of a healthier default when much-loved fries were an option,” said David Just from the Cornell Food and Brand Lab in the US. “We were surprised that this was the case even for a relatively attractive healthy option like apple slices,” Just added in a paper published in the journal BMC Research Notes.

The team analysed 15 children aged from six to eight in a study in which they ordered a meal of chicken nuggets from a fast food restaurant to see if they would opt out of the healthy option. Half of the children were given fries with their meal and told they could exchange them for apples and the other half were given apples and told that they could exchange them for fries.

The results suggested that even when the default side was apples, 86.7 per cent opted to swap for fries.

“A more realistic solution would be to offer a smaller portion of fries with apples and in this way, children aren’t forfeiting their favourite food. They are just eating less of it,” said another researcher Brian Wansink.

Source: IANS

If you are able to steadily maintain a lean body all your life, you are likely to live longer in comparison to those who have had since childhood a heavy body that has got heavier during middle age, new research reveals.

The findings showed that people who had a heavy body shape from their childhood and also put on weight during their middle age are at highest risk of mortality with a 15-year risk of death being 19.7 per cent in women and 24.1 per cent in men.

In contrast, those who remained stably lean throughout life had the lowest mortality, with a 15-year risk of death being 11.8 per cent in women, and 20.3 per cent in men.

“Our findings provide further scientific rationale for recommendations of weight management, especially avoidance of weight gain in middle life for long-term health benefit,” said Mingyang Song, doctoral student at Harvard University in the US.

In addition, high body mass index (BMI) in adulthood can also increase the mortality risk.

Among the study participants, lowest mortality was found in the BMI range 22-23 among including healthy non-smokers and excluding people with prevalent diseases.

Obesity has become a public health crisis in most countries worldwide. But, these results indicate the importance of weight management across the lifespan, the researchers noted.

For the results — published in The BMJ — the team of researchers tracked the evolution of body shape and associated mortality in two large cohort studies. Body shape of 80,266 women and 36,622 men were studied at ages five, 10, 20, 30, and 40 years. Their body mass indexes were measured at age 50 and were followed from age 60 over a median of 15-16 years for death. In a second study, the team carried out a large meta-analysis of 230 prospective studies with more than 3.74 million deaths among more than 30.3 million participants.

They analysed people who never smoked to rule out the effects of smoking and the lowest mortality was observed in the BMI range 23-24 among this group.

Source: IANS

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